Summer

 Summer by Jan Godown Annino more time immersed in water meals made without cooking them less care with my looks pared schedules serendipity daydreams writing reading c.  Jan Godown Annino Water! This summer I’m in the water more than usual, but also, working with deadlines I didn’t expect. Below, I’m sharing lines from a poem that feels … Continue reading

Nelson Mandela by J. Patrick Lewis

  July 18th is a day for Mr. Nelson Mandela, who said,   “It is within your hands to make of our world, a better world for all.”   Thank you, Anastasia Suen & POETRY FRIDAY & J. Patrick Lewis. The J. Patrick Lewis poem gives me goose bumps, especially at one line: Nelson Mandela … Continue reading

Collecting poets : William Jay Smith

Collecting poems & poets: William Jay Smith   I’ve known one person with a hat box of printed poems she collected from here & there. Magazines, mainly, but also plucked from church bulletins, found on post cards, and in newspapers, back when newspapers printed poems. The collector was my amazing mother, a secretary at Rockefeller … Continue reading

Dad’s Days

Advice shared by my father – Live as close to your work as possible Never go to bed angry at anybody Think pleasant thoughts Grow vegetables & flowers Look up at the night sky Stand at the shore & think about who & what are on the other shore Doubt what leaders, including preachers, say … Continue reading

Poet characters

ZURI Jackson is a junior poet character who writes: Danitra’s scared of pigeons. I promised not to tell. Then I opened my big mouth and out the secret fell. I tried to shove it right back in, though it was much too late. I told her I was sorry, but Danitra didn’t wait. lines from “The … Continue reading

Green Poetry

Kermit’s green is a color that surrounds us here in North Florida so you would think it is hard to miss. But guess what – don’t we all experience how that which is familiar, can become less special? But, Ho! Visitors from the parched West arrive. And they play in our nature’s backyard. And so … Continue reading

Answering questions

Kathy Halsey, a retired librarian who is writing for children, wants to know: Q: What is your writing process? Q: What are you currently working on? Q: And so forth.   A: First, thank you for your career, Kathy, matching books to readers. And thank you for your 2nd career, as a writer. Back to … Continue reading

A young poet in character

The poet Naomi Shihab Nye edited the poetry anthology SALTING THE OCEAN, which is afloat with the vibrant writings of young poets. Like Nye, I think that attention paid to young poet voices can build peace, provide future strong leaders and just make any poet’s day. If you agree, Poetry Out Loud,  is a brilliant program you … Continue reading

Ursus

This time of year big black refrigerators of the woods, bears, still slumber in the United States. Bear specialists tell us that here in Florida, they don’t enter a true hibernation. A few published poems of mine are about black bears. That is fitting as these wild, grub and berry eaters and I have met up three times unexpectedly. I’m not … Continue reading

SUGAR HILL

When I made a trip from Florida to visit a newsgal pal, Deborah, who lived in New York City in the 1980s, one day I arranged to ride a bus to one of the city’s most fascinating neighborhoods, Harlem. Harlem is connected to Florida in many ways but especially because Zora Neale Hurston, James Weldon Johnson, Augusta Savage and … Continue reading

Asteroids, sheep, flower

I love where we live but this afternoon I have a strong urge to build a rocket and land it at the Morgan Library, where our family has enjoyed hours among the giant rooms and manuscripts. Today I would dwell with materials curated by  Christine Nelson, about THE LITTLE PRINCE. Since I won’t be doing that … Continue reading

Angel Island

Ellis Island and the Statue of Liberty were important to  my family, where stories were told about my mother’s Irish and Danish relatives landing on U.S.A. shores. As a Jersey gal for the first stretch of my child days, images of the outstretched arm and golden lamp were more tangible than other U.S.A. icons, say, … Continue reading

Poetry Friday

Today is Friday, PoetryFriday! (Poetry Friday links are below) Today, among the three or four mighty fine books I’ll have time to read in school as a BookPALS volunteer to five classes, I’ll share this favorite: WHEN LUCY GOES OUT WALKING. This is a fun calendar book from Ashley Wolff.  I am lucky to have met … Continue reading

Miracle Mail

Miracle Mail  from  Bookseedstudio/ Jan Godown Annino The entryway basket brims with these. Every holiday card in the palm frond basket is plucked from our ginormous black box at the end of our driveway. As a child on my appointed rounds, as I ambled in the scratchy fields and skimmed along the sides of dark … Continue reading

In the company of trees

Think of your strong images of trees. Climbing? Jumping from them? Picking pears from low branches? I am fortunate to know days of those sports. Here are more leaves of this memory scrapbook – Palms bowing down against the wet sluice of hurricanes. Brown hairs of Resurrection Fern transforming to lime green after rain. Morning … Continue reading

Gratitude in this latitude

Haiku poems offer the reader stories in three little lines. For this time of gratitude, here  are Thankus, Haiku poems of thanks. I am fortunate to know about THANKUS from poet April Halprin Wayland. ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^ FLORIDA THANKUS Giving Thanks #1 by Jan Godown Annino Run red hills and dale Not found in Sarasota We are like … Continue reading

Poetry Friday in October

Poetry Friday in October It is easy in October To forget the clover Of the summertime shade As the pumpkin candles flicker And our steps are going quicker Find a bit of bookade with the poetry of these days   Presenting a Poetry Friday collection of select  silly Halloween Read Alouds. enjoy!    

The mystery is history

The mystery is history About now in the school year a search is on. Students round up a few likely suspects: http://www.floridamemory.com/onlineclassroom/history_fair/#bet They probe into their past. And they create a short script, or construct a table display or write an essay about the object of their attention. If they are passionate and well-informed and … Continue reading

Reading by firefly light

Reading by firefly light The lights of my childhood summers were sunset light, full moon light, shore cottage porch light and then after we moved to Florida, phosphorescent light. You may remember the glow of other summer lights- campfire light, lantern light… Because we are enjoying recurring deluges of rain this summer – welcome by … Continue reading

Summer salads

Summer salads We are full into summer. It is fecund and tasty. The last of three summer presentations is upcoming soon. And I’m happy to be at work with the boost of pals in three writing challenges. I’ll see you in September! The images (C. copyrighted as is all material here) are from summer fun … Continue reading

May Days of Book Play

My cat isn’t literary. He drapes his tube body of orange-ginger fur across my belly as I fall into the latest page turner (in this case a journal, The Marjorie Kinnan Rawlings Journal of Florida Literature). And, I decide that the smile Ginger’s mouth makes, is from absorbing my joy in reading. Each spring I … Continue reading

The “p” in April is for ?

The P in April is for ? We played a game in our family that involved verses. When I was six, seven, eight, my Aunt Florence if she was visiting, but more often my mother, would point to me. Then began the count, out loud: “ 1, 2, 3…. By 10, I had to start … Continue reading

March on!

March on! As a writer for the inaugural North America-wide celebration of girl power, known forever now as KID LIT CELEBRATES WOMEN’S HISTORY MONTH I’m here to say, who knew? Who knew the discovered details of these overlooked lives, & their stunning superior accomplishments? Who? Who? Your writers did. Your anonymous, and sometimes, famous, researching … Continue reading

Creative juice

What makes the creative juice flow? It can be walking in silence at the end of a fire drill line of kids who have their quiet fingers held up to their lips, walking with them out the school door on a drill, walking behind the boy who imagines with the other hand he is spraying … Continue reading

Hop Around the Block

  Your correspondent here at Bookseedstudio, Jan Annino,  is in a tag team book blog hop.    My  thanks  to  the author who tagged me,  Anne Macdonald of the Guppy Listserv & her blog, Anne’s Writing Life      At the end of this blog  I tag the next author-hoppers.   And if it’s enabled on … Continue reading

Typing with Ginger

National Novel Writing Month 2012 In October I didn’t discern that my neurons held an idea for a particular strong new mystery character. That was well before the accumulation of the mini-marathons that 30 days of NaNoWriMo in November ushers in, at least for many writers. This year for it, I nested online in a community … Continue reading

gratitude for my latitude

With the wee drop in temperatures in North Florida,  I sense a tempo  leap. And so matching that, I am almost completed with revising a chapter book. On a new project, I touch the word count bar to see how far a new story character and I journeyed in one day. I read a mistake. … Continue reading

shadow season

It’s shadow season. Visits to real-life houses built centuries before, trips up the stairs to eerie attics, and doors opened on creaky cupboards, might reveal a scarab, sphinx or a selkie. Here’s a few images from our recent visit to the lovely Orman House in Florida’s Panhandle. This is North Florida. Author Gloria Jahoda labeled the area, … Continue reading

Here First

They Were Here First I am aware of this, about American Indian Tribal members: American Indians aren’t “people of color.” And also, for many American Indians, being called American Indian, or being known as Native American, isn’t a preferred moniker. What is? Specificity, such as the name of the Tribe and, if it’s known, the … Continue reading

Back to school

The schedule called for me to visit with students who study in a locked-in  situation. Before I already presented there on a picture book  topic- with a handful of  elementary age students. It hurt to imagine why little ones were in such a setting. But I was assured that their continual extreme misbehaviors had warranted … Continue reading

For A Song

Have you written a song inspired by a father? I’d like to mention one, one inspired by a Kentucky father. “Which Side Are You On,” is a ballad written by Florence Reece, the wife of  coal minder Sam Reece & also the daughter of a coal-miner. There are several ideas about the song’s origins, with … Continue reading

notes – Mother’s Day Weekend 2012

A very good ‘bye & two hellos Suitably for a memorial,  clouds opened up Sunday May 13 in time for umbrellas to pop like mushrooms, among congregants arriving at church to reflect upon the life of author & scientist Anne Rudloe.  Because she was a Buddhist teacher I wondered if we would find jewel- tone prayer flags & sandalwood … Continue reading

March music

March is a month with a perfect (English-language) name. And it carries a perfect theme- Women’s History Month. Either way, March dwells in the world of movin’ on,  heading out. PLUS, for a good cause you can bid on She Sang Promise, my picture book about Betty Mae Jumper, at the link below. TWO BOOKS … Continue reading

Hats on for a cat

In towns tiny and cities cavernous, listeners and readers are lining up   to celebrate the creative chileren’s books of Theodor Seuss Geisel, the Cat-in-the -Hat man.  March 2, 1904 was the day of his birth. The place was Springfield, MA, which as we all would imagine, gives a rollicking good party for the memory of … Continue reading

Tabby on Fort George Island

It’s not often that I can stroll around the great northeast part of Florida. But when I am in the Fernandina Beach region, as my husband & I were recently to enjoy literature & dance a bit at the comprehensive & fun Amelia Island Book Festival, I think of shells. This region’s coast is characterized … Continue reading

bookish cheese, with cat & mouse

What was by my side from the Thanksgiving holidays right on through, well, it’s still by my side, is cheese. I’m not talking about the cream cheese with chives of my youth or the brie of my 30s, but the robust hard cheeses of my middle age. And If I look to share blame for … Continue reading

Workshop Friday/MLK Jr. Weekend

I prowl around for prompts. And so I found inspiration in HEART TO HEART, edited by Jan Greenberg. This collection of visual art features  poems created by writers who feel a connection to a work of art.   When I paged to  Faith Ringgold’s art and  Angela Johnson’s poem, “From Above” I felt a tingle. Angela’s … Continue reading

American Indian Perspectives on Thanksgiving

If you are not of American Indian/Native American heritage, have you still ever wondered what some of your  impressions & ideas might be about the holiday, if you were a member of a Tribe? Courtesy of the Smithsonian Institution National Museum of the American Indian, which I always like to visit first whenever I am … Continue reading

From George W. to Joseph B.

When not yet 16, George Washington copied 41 rules of civil behavior, (scroll down if  a list of site topics precede this), at least one of which, I violated Halloween Weekend. After a day that began early I nodded  off at night  during a top-drawer, well-staged & otherwise eye-popping theater performance. I woke quickly so … Continue reading