books to love from Kathryn Erskine, Georgia Heard & Irene Latham

My Thoughts Are Clouds is the poetry collection that cozies up to my heart this summer more than other beauties I cherish. Whatever a temporal worry – health, family, climate, political,societal –  anxiety fades within the pages of Clouds, byGeorgia Heard with art fromIsabel Roxas.

A flower doesn’t need to count up the raindrops it sips

add up the number of bees tickling its petals’

 lines of Georgia Heard from My Thoughts Are Clouds, Poems for Mindfulness:

::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::National Book Award winner Kathryn Erskine raises her own author bar with each book. She is known for criss-crossing oceans to lunch with children and listen to the stories of their lives, worldwide, with sensitivity and kindness thru all her years – child and adult days. Her uni-verse (one song) perspective seamlessly weaves wonderful results in a domestic USA school story where bullying invites timid new pals to stand up for The Good. I especially love the way we see how the beautiful variety of cultures is nourished in  some schools, in this case a public school. Lily’s Promise is a peace-bringer.

“Algebra began in Babylon, which is modern-day Iraq!” from Lily’s Promise by Kathryn Erskine.

I nominate this author and this book for the Jane Addams Peace Prize, if the committee is listening.

:::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::

Do you want a page-turning doorstopper delight? D-39 A Robo Dog’s Journey is told in free verse by the always inventive Irene Latham. I bought it because I love Irene’s themes and words in books such as Dictionary for a Better World (with Charles Waters.) and Cat Man of Aleppo (last year’s Caldecott winner.) I can’t remember the last time a dystopian novel held me. Maybe never. I’m converted to this dystopian. It’s a father-daughter journey with heart tugs. It’s also an unexpected tale of an older girl protecting a younger kid, who’s not part of her birth family. And there is an unusual dog tale. And lots of gizmos and gadgets. And underground nooks & crannies the characters explore with us.

Here’s opening lines ©Irene Latham in D-39 A Robo-Dog’s Journey

“Hey Hi Ho There

/It’s me, Klynt Tovis, coming to you live/  from a looganut farm in the Worselands.I click the button on the ham, ears alert/ for a reply. I’m not supposed to talk to/ strangers, even on an old ham radio-/ unlicensed broadcasts are against the law. “

In fact, as I type this, seeing D-39 scenes in my mind’s eye, I feel D-39 would look brilliant on the screen, like a Hugo meets Up.Or something like that. Did I mention the brilliant glossary of the tale’s inventive words? A favorite O’ mine is *jinglesnap* but I know you will select (and want to create) your own.

::::::::::::::::

As with the best kids’ books, these three shared here will please a caring adult. I’m lucky to know these brilliant and sensitive authors through workshops and in the case of Irene, also via Southern Breeze/ SCBWI.

SCBWI

https://southern-breeze.scbwi.org

Georgia Heard                             Isabel Roxas

https://www.georgiaheard.com       https://studioroxas.com/about

Kathryn Erskine

https://www.kathyerskine.com

Irene Latham

https://www.irenelatham.com

Bookseedstudio is happy to be part of the #PoetryFriday community. For an unusual take on Wakulla Springs at Tallahassee, please see Laura Shovan’s poetry post. She is also this times 4th of July weekend host. Appreciations to Laura, whose poem about an overlooked Hollywood studio artist has won recognition!

Read a poem every day. Help a child memorize one for Life.

And if you like poetry, literature & mindfulness caring about our Uni-Verse, consider looking at this new blog on WordPress by two wise ones I know through #PoetryFriday – MaryLee & Franki – who I found here on WordPress at A(other) Year of Reading ::: https://ayearofreading.org/blog Yay !for the next 15+ years of blogging to them.

12 thoughts on “books to love from Kathryn Erskine, Georgia Heard & Irene Latham

  1. What a great post, Jan! I loved D39 and especially the wonderful vocabulary that Irene created. How fun is that!? I also loved the initial lines you shared from Georgia Heard’s “My Thoughts are Clouds.” I’ll definitely need to check that out! Thanks for this delicious smorgasbord of a post!

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  2. Jan, I’m hoping I have at least two of these books awaiting me inside the stack of boxes that have arrived for the NCTE poetry award committee. Thanks for letting me know about LILLY’S PROMISE–sounds like a winner too. You are a very good celebrator!

    Liked by 1 person

  3. I’m nearly finished reading Lily’s Promise! It’s lovely, and so important in its treatment of middle school life, diversity, and inclusion. Lily is a brave soul, who just might learn to speak up when she sees injustice happening,

    Also, I’ve heard so much about D-39. Irene Latham is a gem of a writer. I really need to read that book too! And of course, any book by Georgia Heard will be beautifully written. Thank you, Jan!

    Liked by 1 person

  4. Jan, you have planted some beautiful book seeds here–some books that I have added to my want to read list. Thanks for the good recommendations, and I hope the award committees are listening.

    Liked by 1 person

  5. Wow! Great post, Jan. I also loved Lily’s Promise. Kathy Erskine makes a novel that weaves peace and justice into middle school life effortless. How does she do that? And, as you know, I predict awards for D-39. It’s an awesome book. I’ve been talking about it with my librarian friends. I’m so glad you are getting the word out too! Definitely some future award winners in this post. Now, I need to go read Clouds. It sounds wonderful.

    Liked by 1 person

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